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Archive for the ‘Camden Yards’ Category

Brooks Robinson Statue at Camden Yards

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Washington Boulevard and W Camden Street (Street View)

GPS: 39° 17′ 6.42″ N 76° 37′ 22.63″ W

Brooks Robinson played his entire baseball career with the Baltimore Orioles, winning the MVP of the 1970 World Series. Considered the greatest defensive third baseman of all time, Brooks won 16 gold gloves during his 23 years in Major League Baseball. He was invited to 18 All-Star games and won the American League MVP award after the 1964 season. Brooks was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1983.

This statue was unveiled on October 22, 2011 next to Oriole Park at Camden Yards. Oddly, the bronze likeness was not placed along side the Babe Ruth Statue on stadium grounds. Orioles owner Peter Angelos never offered the location and didn’t even show up to the ceremony. Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake was also absent without reason. The statue was privately instigated and funded by the former CEO of Crown Central Petroleum Henry Rosenberg.

The Maryland born Joseph Sheppard was chosen to execute the Oriole great’s monument. Sheppard created the Pope John Paul II statue and the Flame at the Holocaust Memorial. He also painted the mural of five panels inside Police Headquarters. Working out of his studios in Pietrasanta, Italy and Baltimore City, Sheppard has created a substantial body of work. The artist has reached a level of success achieved by few Baltimore artists. Architect: Richard Jones of Mahan Rykiel Associates.

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Written by monumentcity

March 27th, 2012 at 7:58 am

B&O Warehouse at Camden Yards

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The B&O Warehouse at Camden Yards is located along the right field boundary of Oriole Park. A former structure of the B&O Railroad, the narrow building was part of Baltimore’s Camden Station. Early in the 19th century when trade with the western interior United States threatened Charm City’s historic port economy, a plan was hatched to build a railway connecting Baltimore to the Ohio River. Camden Station was completed in 1856.

In 1905 construction of the E. Francis Baldwin and Josias Pennington designed warehouse was finished by James Stewart and Company, its unique design necessary so it could squeeze between Eutaw Street and the station’s pre-existing railroad tracks. Today the structure contains offices for the Orioles’ staff, businesses and restaurants. At 1,116 feet, the Warehouse at Camden Yards is the longest building in America east of the Mississippi.

Written by monumentcity

January 26th, 2010 at 7:14 am

Johnny Unitas Statue at Ravens Stadium

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W Hamburg Street & Russell Street (Street View)

GPS: 39° 16′ 45.09″ N 76° 37′ 19.89″ W

History

Johnny Unitas was one of the greatest American football players of all time. When he retired from the league, in 1974, he held practically every record for quarterbacks, finishing his career with 290 touchdowns and over 40,000 yards passing. After attending Louisville University, Unitas was drafted by his hometown Pittsburgh Steelers, but did not make the team. He eventually landed at a tryout for the Baltimore Colts and was asked to join the organization. That following NFL season when the Colts starting quarterback went down he was inserted in to the starting lineup, and ended up winning the MVP award. The next year he led the team to their first of back-to-back championships in what sports historians call the greatest game ever played. Unitas died of heart attack on September 11, 2002.

Notes

The fourteen-foot tall monument depicts Unitas in a throwing motion, seemingly heaving a long pass down field. Erected at the north entrance of Ravens Stadium, the statue sits in the middle of Unitas Plaza. Giant posters of the legendary quarterback flank the ticket gates on either side of the bronze likeness. 290 replicas of the sculpture, each standing 21 inches tall, were created as well, one for each touchdown Unitas threw during his professional career. Dedicated on October 20, 2002, the statue is the creation of artist Frederick Kail. A slightly smaller Unitas memorial, also made by Kail, is situated at the Louisville University football stadium.

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May 21st, 2009 at 10:28 am

Babe Ruth Statue at Camden Yards

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S Eutaw Street and W Camden Street (Street View)

GPS: 39° 17′ 5.98″ N 76° 37′ 14.48″ W

Also known as “Babe’s Dream”

History

George Herman “Babe” Ruth was born in Baltimore’s Pigtown neighborhood in his grandparent’s home on February 6, 1895. He eventually was sent to Saint Mary’s Industrial School to learn the textile trade. Ruth played catcher and pitcher for the school creating attention with local scouts. He was signed by Jack Dunn to the then-minor league Baltimore Orioles in 1914. The Babe got his nickname when Dunn, who had become George’s legal guardian in order to sign him, was seen by his team with the young baseball player. The Oriole veterans dubbed him ‘Jack’s newest babe’, and the name stuck. On July 9, 1914, he was traded to the Boston Red Sox. This statue was dedicated in 1998 and is by sculptor Susan Luery and New Arts Foundry in Hampden.

Notes

“Babe’s Dream” resides in a plaza south of Eutaw and Camden, in the northwest corner of Camden Yards. Also in the courtyard are a number of waist-high numerical sculptures commemorating famous ballplayers. The building to the immediate east of the plaza was once Camden Station and now houses the Sports Legends Museum. George Herman Ruth was born around the corner in a rowhouse at 216 Emory Street.

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Written by monumentcity

February 20th, 2009 at 9:40 am