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Archive for the ‘Charles Village’ Category

Spring House of Dairy at the BMA

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The Baltimore Museum of Art is located in Charles Village at the bottom edge of Johns Hopkins University’s Homewood campus. The BMA features paintings by Matisse, Picasso and Van Gogh along side ancient mosaics, miniatures and stained glass. And admission is free. The Spring House of Dairy sits on the western end of the museum’s property. Designed by acclaimed architect Benjamin Henry Latrobe in 1812, the small building was once located in what is now Roland Park at the former Oakland estate. Oakland was owned by the retired South Carolina State Senator Robert Goodloe Harper, a close friend of Latrobe’s, and the son-in-law of Charles Carroll of Carrollton. The building was originally situated over a running spring using the cool waters to preserve milk and other perishables. Spring House had a detailed frieze (possibly sculpted by Antonio Capellano) that has since been lost to the ages.

When John Russell Pope was designing the Baltimore Museum of Art in 1929, the Spring House of Dairy was donated to the project. Pope reconstructed the small Neoclassical style structure with as many original components as possible. He used the construction to offset the Wyman Gatehouse at the other end of the property, the subtle technique providing a balanced perspective between the lot’s three buildings.

Written by monumentcity

March 2nd, 2011 at 10:18 am

Cathedral of the Incarnation on Clover Hill

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The Cathedral of the Incarnation, designed by architect Philip H. Frohman, stands at the top of historic Clover Hill. Frohman is best known for his work on the Washington National Cathedral, a project he supervised from 1921 until his death in 1972. The Peace Cross Memorial is on the church grounds and the Confederate Women of Maryland Monument is across Charles Street.

Local Filmmaker Steve Blair wrote and directed the comedy “I Do & I Don’t” starring Jane Lynch. Shot entirely in Baltimore, Blair and his crew filmed several scenes featuring the Cathedral of the Incarnation at 4 East University Parkway.

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August 25th, 2010 at 12:16 pm

Stanford White and Baltimore’s Lovely Lane Church

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Stanford White (1853-1906) was one of the most successful and gifted architects of the Gilded Age. A partner in the prominent New York design firm, McKim, Mead and White, Stanford was known for his detailed artistic renderings. Specializing in elaborate private residences, he created a variety of houses throughout the eastern United States, along with public buildings and churches. The second Madison Square Garden was designed by White, its rooftop the eventual site of his highly publicized murder.

In 1906, White was shot in the head by the millionaire Harry Kendall Thaw during the premiere performance of Mam’zelle Champagne. Thaw, an avid drug user and possible sadist, was the husband of 21 year-old Evelyn Nesbit, a model, actress and former lover of White. The murder was mistaken as exhibition by the excited Madison Square Roof Garden crowd, cheers gleefully trailing three point blank pistol shots. Two massively popular trials ensued and Thaw, after pleading temporary insanity, was sentenced to an asylum. He walked in 1915 and continued his abusive, bizarre life.

White designed north Baltimore’s Lovely Lane United Methodist Church in 1884. Also known as the First Methodist Episcopal Church, the building at 2200 Saint Paul Street was completed in 1887. The Romanesque Revival style construct was modeled after the basilicas of Italy, the tower closely resembling Pomposa Abbey.

Buildings in Baltimore designed by Stanford White:

Written by monumentcity

March 10th, 2010 at 7:03 am

Wyman Estate Gatehouse in Charles Village

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The Wyman Estate Gatehouse is located at the corner of North Charles Street and Art Museum Drive next to the Baltimore Museum of Art. The gatehouse once marked the entrance to the Wyman Estate, a vast rural tract of land north of the city. Samuel Wyman purchased the elegant property from Charles Carroll of Carrollton’s great-grandson, John Lee Carroll, in 1839.

William Wyman, son of Samuel, hired architect Richard Upjohn to design a mansion on the property around the time of the Civil War. Homewood Villa was razed in 1954 by the university, but the gatehouse remains. The Wyman family owned the land until 1902 when they presented it to Johns Hopkins University. Part of the land was preserved as a city park named in their honor. In 1965 the Johns Hopkins News-Letter moved their headquarters into the gatehouse.

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December 30th, 2009 at 7:00 pm

Homewood House Museum at Johns Hopkins

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The Homewood House Museum is located at 3400 North Charles Street inside the east entrance to Johns Hopkins University. The building’s construction began in 1801 and continued during the decade that followed. The estate was a wedding gift from Charles Carroll of Carrollton to his son Charles Carroll, Jr. and his new bride. A signer of the Declaration of Independence and one of the wealthiest men in America, Charles Carroll of Carrollton basically gave his son an unlimited budget to design and erect the stately manor. The five-part Federal style house was certainly elaborate for its time.

After passing through the Carroll line the property was sold to Samuel Wyman, a successful Baltimore businessman. Wyman’s family eventually gave the land and its constructs to Johns Hopkins University. Restoration began on the mansion house in 1929 and was later completed in the 1980s. Once the headquarters of the College, today the historic building is a period museum open to the public.

Written by monumentcity

December 30th, 2009 at 10:03 am

H. S. Rippel Spring in Wyman Park

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The H. S. Rippel Spring is located just east of the corner of Tudor Arms Avenue and Craycombe Avenue along the Stony Run in Wyman Park. Though dried up today and covered with graffiti, the fountainhead is still in decent condition. The structure was given to Druid Hill Park in 1895 by businessman H. S. Rippel and was later moved to its current location in the 1930s.

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The name of the spring derives from a prominent local builder who donated the fountainstone for the original spring, and whose name is engraved in this stone. The spring enjoyed healthy popularity among some North Baltimore residents during the 30’s and 40’s, often being bottled by local boys who delivered it to nearby residents.

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December 8th, 2009 at 2:47 pm

The Baltimore Museum of Art

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The Baltimore Museum of Art is situated in the northern part of town near the Johns Hopkins University Homewood campus. The art house, designed by John Russell Pope, showcases the collection of the Cone sisters. Claribel and Etta Cone were Baltimore socialites in the late 19th century and early 20th. They were progressive women who, against the grain of their time, studied medicine and never married. The two were born in Tennessee but lived most of their lives in Charm City, residing for over fifty years in neighboring rowhouses on Eutaw Street.

The social circles that the sisters ran gave them a unique opportunity for acquiring art. They were friends with Henri Matisse and Pablo Picasso, gaining direct access to some of the greatest works of a generation. Their collection of Matisse paintings and sculptures is worth the visit in itself, containing over five hundred pieces, it constitutes the most comprehensive group of the French master’s work. Vincent van Gogh, Paul Gauguin and Paul Cézanne are also represented at the museum. Since 2006 the BMA and the Walters Art Gallery in Mount Vernon have been free, excluding certain exhibits.

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December 7th, 2009 at 12:40 pm

Remington-Wyman WWII Servicemen Memorial

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This servicemen memorial was created in honor of those lost during World War II from the Remington / Wyman area neighborhoods.  Erected in 1945, the stone structure stands on the western end of Johns Hopkins Homewood campus near the edge of Remington. Affixed to the stone structure’s backside is a plaque with the names of the fallen soldiers. Edward Berge‘s Chapin Harris Monument is just south on Wyman Park Drive.

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June 21st, 2009 at 9:48 am

Confederate Women of Maryland Monument

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N Charles Street & University Parkway (Street View)

GPS: 39° 19′ 59.71″ N 76° 37′ 6.07″ W

History

Donated by the State of Maryland, this monument is by J. Maxwell Miller, the artist behind the Star-Spangled Banner Centennial Monument. The memorial depicts two stoic women, one of whom is standing looking off into the distance, while the other kneels down clutching the body of a fallen soldier who has dropped his flag. The inscription reads, “In difficulty and danger, regardless of self, they fed the hungry, clothed the needy, nursed the wounded and comforted the dying.”

Notes

The Confederate Women monument is one of several in the city of Baltimore dedicated to the Civil War, including: Union Soldiers & Sailors, Spirit of the Confederacy, and Lee & Jackson.

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Written by monumentcity

May 18th, 2009 at 11:26 am

Peace Cross at the Cathedral of the Incarnation

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N Charles Street & University Parkway (Street View)

GPS: 39° 19′ 59.89″ N 76° 37′ 2.64″ W

History

Dedicated on May 18, 1920, this large Celtic-style cross stands on the grounds of the Cathedral of the Incarnation, just north of Hopkins Homewood Campus. The monument, also known as Victory Cross, is dedicated to the memory of lives lost in WWI. Across the street is the Confederate Women of MD Monument.

Notes

The monument is hidden from immediate view by some trees and resides in an area named Clover Hill, according to a Maryland Historical Society plaque found nearby. Around 1714, this region was part of a 210-acre grant by Lord Baltimore to Charles Merryman, whose descendents lived and farmed here until 1869. In 1909, the site was purchased by the Episcopal Church.

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Written by monumentcity

May 18th, 2009 at 11:11 am