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Lee & Jackson Monument in Charles Village

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Art Museum Drive & Wyman Park Drive (Street View)

GPS: 39° 19′ 27.48″ N 76° 37′ 11.65″ W

History

Dedicated on May 1st, 1948, this monument is by artist Laura Gardin Fraser and was paid for by the $100,000 left in J. Henry Ferguson’s will, who idolized the Confederate generals as a youth. Ferguson died in 1928, a design contest was held in 1935 and Fraser won the commission. Architect John Russell Pope created the base and the dedication took place on the anniversary of the eve of the Battle of Chancellorsville (1863).

On April 18th of 1861, as Civil War hostilities heated up, Lee turned down an offer to become a major general in the US Army, resigned two days later and took up leadership of the Virginia state forces on April 23. General Lee was appointed general-in-chief to the Confederate army on January 31st, 1865. He was quickly named one of the five full generals of the Confederate States of America, but refused to wear the insignia of general, instead wearing the stars of a confederate colonel, equivalent to his last rank in the US Army.

Lee is depicted in this double equestrian monument astride his famed horse, Traveller. Stonewall Jackson (depicted astride “Little Sorrel”) is considered by some to be “one of the most gifted tactical commanders in United States history.” Jackson was accidentally shot by Confederate pickets during the Battle of Chancellorsville. His left arm was amputated but he survived for eight days, at which point he died due to complications of pneumonia. Upon hearing the news, Lee is said to have pronounced, “He has lost his left arm, but I have lost my right.” Completion of this monument was held up by the onset of WWII, and there is a note inscribed on the base thanking the business partners for honoring pre-war contracts and pricing of materials.

Notes

This statue rests at a beautiful high-traffic geographic location within the Remington/Charles Village neighborhoods. The land slopes southward dramatically behind the figures down to the valley of Wyman Park. According to the sculptor, the geography itself mimics the conditions at Chancellorsville. The Baltimore Museum of Art is visible just up the street.

This monument is extremely well-kept and one may often find memorial wreaths and other artifacts laid around its base. Each year, Civil War reenactors meet to commemorate the birthdays of Lee and Jackson on January 19, 1807 and January 21, 1824 respectively. Until recently, the Clipper Room at Shriver Hall on Johns Hopkins campus was rented out for post-celebration festivities. But the annual rental has been disallowed by Hopkins’ new president. A writer for the Maryland Record has even called for this extraordinary historical statue to be razed on account of the Confederate ideals which it commemorates.

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April 17th, 2009 at 7:55 pm

Union Soldiers & Sailors Monument in Charles Village

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W 29th Street & N Charles Street (Street View)

GPS: 39° 19′ 25.64″ N 76° 37′ 4.17″ W

History

This work, by Adolph A. Weinman, was dedicated in 1909, and originally sat in Druid Hill Park (depicted in this postcard). It was moved to its current location in 1959 to make way for an expressway. The monument depicts a Union soldier striding forward with the Goddess Victory to his right and the Goddess Bellona (War) to his left. Behind Bellona rises a fig tree. Reliefs on the north and south sides of the base, respectively, depict a land battle and a naval battle. A third relief on the back of the monument’s pedestal shows an eagle perched on a shield between sword and anchor.

Notes

The Union Soldiers & Sailors Monument has the distinction of being the only public Civil War monument in the city to pay homage to the Northern/Union sacrifices made during that conflict. Diagonally north-east across Wyman Park on Art Museum Drive is the double-equestrian Lee and Jackson Memorial. Not far from that is the Confederate Women monument to the north across Hopkins campus.

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April 14th, 2009 at 4:15 pm

Sea Urchin Statue at Johns Hopkins University

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Decker Gardens at Johns Hopkins University’s Homewood campus

GPS: 39° 19′ 46.79″ N 76° 37′ 20.60″ W

History

In 1926, Edward Berge‘s Sea Urchin, was installed in front of the Lafayette Monument at Mount Vernon Place. Thirty-four years later his son, Henry Berge, created a larger copy of the statue, replacing the original. The smaller cast was then donated by Frank R. Huber, the man financially responsible for the 7’10” reproduction, to Paul M. Higinbotham, who gave the sculpture to Johns Hopkins University.

Notes

The sea urchin sits inside a lily pond on the front lawn of the school president’s home. The man made lagoon features a fountain at the base of the statue, and is dedicated to trustee Alonzo G. Decker, Jr. Just south of the historic Homewood House Museum, the Decker gardens provide a remote hideaway on campus grounds. A bench at the edge of the park offers a perfect seat for sunset watching.

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April 5th, 2009 at 4:09 pm

Johns Hopkins Monument in Charles Village

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N Charles Street & E 33rd Street (Street View)

GPS: 39° 19′ 41.02″ N 76° 37′ 4.55″ W

History

In 1873, Johns Hopkins died. In 1875, a university in his name was established, one of many institutions that would eventually use his moniker. A Quaker from a plantation in Virginia, Hopkins and his brothers first business was selling supplies from covered wagons in the Shenandoah Valley. Occasionally they traded goods for corn whiskey, repackaged the liquor, and sold it to Baltimoreans as Hopkins Best. After a series of businesses Hopkins eventually helped bankroll the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad during the company’s westward expansion, bailing the company out of debt several times and making himself a very wealthy man in the process. During and after the Civil War, Hopkins thrived as an investor and professional, becoming one of the richest men in American history.

Notes

The bust of Johns Hopkins, sculpted by Hans Schuler, rests atop a tall foundation and is flanked by two statues, one a young male and the other a youthful female. Originally located at North Charles Street & East 34th Street, the structure was moved a block south due to numerous automobile accidents attributed to its placement. Surrounded by lush vegetation, with the school’s campus behind, the monument presents a dignified view of an American icon.

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Written by monumentcity

March 29th, 2009 at 3:24 pm

Chapin A. Harris Memorial Bust in Charles Village

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W 31st Street & Wyman Park Drive (Street View)

GPS: 39° 19′ 29.35″ N 76° 37′ 15.72″ W

History

The story of formal dentistry begins with Chapin A Harris. Between 1839 and 1840, Harris was instrumental in starting the first dental college, the first society for dental surgeons, and the first dental publication, the American Journal of Dental Science. The original list of subscribers to this pamphlet was discovered by G V Black, the seminal dentist to use nitrous oxide, and published thereafter, providing a transcript of the origins of dentistry. Harris published numerous books during his lifetime, many of which were used as medical guides throughout the world. He acted as dean and as a professor at the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery until his untimely death in 1860.

Notes

Nestled within a loosely trimmed hedge, the memorial bust rests atop a podium with Chapin’s last name and life dates on the front. Harris wears a dignified jacket with scarf and stands facing the university’s main campus. The sculpture, dedicated in 1922, is yet another piece created by Baltimore’s Edward Berge. The bust originally stood at the intersection of North and Linden Avenues before it was moved to Wyman Park. Within shouting distance is the double equestrian statue of General Robert E. Lee and General Stonewall Jackson.

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March 23rd, 2009 at 3:27 pm

William H. Welch Statue at Johns Hopkins

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In front of Shriver Hall on Johns Hopkins University’s main campus

GPS: 39° 19′ 36.46″ N 76° 37′ 12.50″ W

History

H. L. Mencken, once known as the Sage of Baltimore, wrote a 1935 Baltimore Sun article about William H Welch and his life of excess. According to Mencken, Welch had little or no concern with his own health, instead concentrating on the conditions of others. He chose study over sleep, food instead of diet, and meditation before activity. He was a career physician, having learned at Yale and in Germany, eventually becoming the first dean of the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. During his later career he was elected president of the National Academy of Sciences and the American Medical Association, accomplishments only trumped by his various appetites. William Welch was a beer for breakfast kind of guy, yet he was able to move the medical profession as far forward as anyone in his generation. He lived to be eighty-four years old.

Notes

To the left of Shriver Hall’s entrance, on Johns Hopkins University‘s main campus, the statue stands tall on it’s pedestal. To the memorial’s immediate left is the Isaiah Bowman Bust, with Daniel Coit Gilman’s monument only a few paces beyond that. Welch is posed with his right hand’s index finger pointing upward, as though he were making one final speech. Sidney Waugh created the structure and it was erected in 1957.

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March 20th, 2009 at 3:29 pm

Daniel Coit Gilman Statue at Johns Hopkins

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In front of Shriver Hall on Johns Hopkins University’s main campus

GPS: 39° 19′ 36.43″ N 76° 37′ 13.58″ W

History

Asked in 1875 to be the first president of Johns Hopkins University, Daniel Coit Gilman left the campus of California University, where he was dean, and accepted his new post in the east. Gilman attended Yale and was a member of the secret society Skull and Bones. He is co-founder of the Russell Trust, the organization that funds Yale’s famous ambiguous association.

Gilman is highly regarded for his ability to assemble premiere scholars and teachers for his universities, establishing these schools as top academic institutions. He wrote several books, including the still-published Life of James Monroe. In 1898 he edited and wrote an introduction to Democracy in America, the classic volume by French author Alexis De Toqueville. In 1908, after a long and successful life, Daniel Coit Gilman passed away in the city of his birth, Norwich, Connecticut.

Notes

Flanked to the right of Johns Hopkins University’s Shriver Hall, the Gilman statue stands tall and regal. Installed in 1957, the monument shares its historic site with the Isaiah Bowman Bust and the William H Welch statue. The likeness of Gilman was designed by the artist Sidney Waugh.

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March 20th, 2009 at 10:40 am

Isaiah Bowman Bust at Johns Hopkins

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Shriver Hall on Johns Hopkins University’s main campus

GPS: 39° 19′ 36.48″ N 76° 37′ 13.00″ W

History

Isaiah Bowman was born in Canada in 1878. His immense talent for Geography was recognized early in his life by his hometown teachers, and he eventually studied at Harvard and Yale. He taught at Yale for ten years and while there he wrote several scholarly pieces on physical terrain. In 1916 Bowman was named director of the American Geographical Society, serving in that post until 1935, when he became president of Johns Hopkins University. He was an adviser to Presidents Woodrow Wilson and Teddy Roosevelt during his illustrious career, and the true scope of his contributions to the world will likely be unknown until his personal diaries are made public.

Notes

Placed under the facade of Shriver Hall, the Bowman bust is difficult to locate at first glance. The statue is situated to the left of the Hall’s front door, hiding from unsuspecting eyes. Illuminated at night by lights, this tribute to one of the world’s great geographers greets students and concert goers daily. Laura Gardin Fraser, sculptor of the Lee and Jackson monument, created the statue, and it was dedicated in 1957.

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March 18th, 2009 at 11:20 am

Sidney Lanier Monument in Charles Village

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3436 N Charles Street, Johns Hopkins University (Street View)

GPS: 39° 19′ 52.45″ N 76° 37′ 5.19″ W

History

Born in 1842, Sidney Lanier’s life was forever shaped by the Civil War. Upon graduating Oglethorpe College in Milledgeville, Georgia, the War Between the States broke out and Lanier enlisted in the Confederate Army. He was captured by Union soldiers near Wilmington, North Carolina, and placed at Point Lookout Prison in Saint Mary’s County, Maryland. Lookout was by far the worst Union POW camp, with bitter cold conditions and no barracks, the captured soldiers and civilians died by the scores.

Of the fifty thousand detainees, some four thousand perished, and countless others contracted tuberculosis. Lanier was not spared, and he left the jail skinny and emaciated, bound to suffer from consumption for the rest of his short life. Lanier wrote his only novel, Tiger Lilies, about his tumultuous time at Point Lookout.

After the Civil War he traveled extensively in search of a cure for his disease, eventually landing in Baltimore, where he was asked to fill the first flute chair in the newly formed Peabody Orchestra. In a letter to his wife, he expounds on the benefits of Charm City, explaining that they could “dwell in [this] beautiful city, among the great libraries, and [in the] midst of the music, the religion, and the art that we love–and I could write my books and be the man I wish to be.” He continued creating poetry and literary papers, writing some of his most loved pieces while in Baltimore.

Towards the end of his life, Lanier took a teaching position at Johns Hopkins University. He passed away in 1881 and is buried in Green Mount Cemetery. In 1942, a monument designed by Hans Schuler was dedicated in his honor.

Notes

The relief style monument depicts Lanier sitting tranquilly under a tree as the sun sets behind him. He is holding a pencil in his right hand and has a journal on his lap. His flute rests next to him on top of an open book. The bronze cast is set into a stone embankment, making this one of the more unique memorials in the city. There are two benches flanking the monument, and a stone path between them, allowing for an intimate view of the structure.

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March 17th, 2009 at 11:24 am

Spirit of Music Statue in Charles Village

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3070 N Charles Street, next to the BMA sculpture garden (Street View)

GPS: 39° 19′ 38.31″ N 76° 37′ 4.28″ W

History

Dedicated in 2002, The Spirit of Music is a memorial to a former Johns Hopkins University student. Rex Chao was shot and killed near the school’s Milton S Eisenhower Library on an evening in April, 1996, by a fellow student and former friend. Choa played violin for the Hopkins and Peabody Orchestras. He was nineteen years old when he died. Jud Hartmann, who’s Creator’s Game Monument stands outside of the Lacrosse Museum on campus, was commissioned to design the memorial by a committee established in the fallen scholar’s honor.

Notes

Installed between the Johns Hopkins Monument and the BMA sculpture garden, the statue rests inside of a well-trimmed circular hedge. With violin in left hand and bow in right, the two-thirds scale bronze cast gazes optimistically at all those passing by.

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March 15th, 2009 at 11:27 am