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Spirit of the Confederacy Monument in Bolton Hill

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Mount Royal Terrace between Mosher & Lafayette (Street View)

GPS: 39° 18′ 31.75″ N 76° 37′ 21.03″ W

History

Known as the Spirit of the Confederacy, this monument reads upon the front face of the pedestal, “Gloria Victis,” or “Glory to the Vanquished.” Though this sculpture is by Frederic Wellington Ruckstull and was dedicated in February of 1903, Gloria Victis is also the title of a 1874 sculpture at the National Gallery in Washington, DC by artist Antonin Mercie commemorating France’s loss in the Franco-Prussian War. Mercie is the sculptor responsible for the nearby Francis Scott Key Monument.

Notes

The monument stands between Mt Royal Avenue proper, and Mt Royal Terrace, a parallel access street for residents of the Bolton Hill neighborhood. Nearby stand several buildings of the Maryland Institute, College of Art. The sculpture is composed of two figures: the allegorical figure of Glory with wings outstretched, who holds aloft a laurel wreath in one hand, and in the other supports a soldier whose strength is failing him. His flag is lowered and he seems near defeat.

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Written by monumentcity

April 1st, 2009 at 3:53 pm

John Mifflin Hood Statue in Preston Gardens

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Saratoga Street and St. Paul Street in Preston Gardens (Street View)

GPS: 39° 17′ 32.95″ N 76° 36′ 49.24″ W

History

Depicts John Mifflin Hood, the Maryland businessman who was an early president of the Western Maryland Railroad. Under Hood’s guidance the railroad was able to regain market share, becoming very profitable. Baltimore City owned considerable stock in the company, resulting in massive profit. After the Great Fire of 1904 the city used six million dollars of railroad earnings to pay for reconstruction. In appreciation, a monument was erected, one block from the origin of the fire, in Mifflin Hood’s honor. It was later moved to it’s current location in Preston Gardens. Dedicated May 11, 1911. Artist: Richard E. Brooks.

Notes

Hood’s monument is tucked away in a park known as Preston Gardens which lies in between St. Paul Street’s north and south-bound lanes. The monument is flanked on either side by a fountain and winding staircases connect the upper and lower sections of St. Paul. Curving sidewalks flow throughout this surprisingly placid location.

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Written by monumentcity

February 20th, 2009 at 9:05 am