Monument City Blog

Branches of Baltimore History

Archive for the ‘Education’ Category

McKim Free School

without comments

The McKim Free School was established in 1821 with a $600.00 endowment provided by merchant John McKim. The Baltimore Quaker died in 1819, leaving detailed instructions for his two sons, Isaac and William, to carry out. The McKim brothers hired the design team of William Key Howard, son of John Eager Howard, and William F. Small, who trained under Benjamin Henry Latrobe for two years, to create the Greek Revival style building located at 1232 E. Baltimore Street. Opening in 1833, the school was Charm City’s first free school, offering much needed education to disadvantaged children. The building is an imitation of the Temple of Theseus in Athens. The Friends Meeting House, the oldest religious building in Baltimore, is just around the corner. The two buildings combine to form the McKim Community Association campus.

Written by monumentcity

January 9th, 2010 at 9:13 am

Frederick Douglass Memorial in Fells Point

with 2 comments

South Caroline Street & Philpot Street (Street View)

GPS: 39° 16′ 45.60″ N 76° 35′ 46.80″ W

History

One of the most important figures in American civil rights, Frederick Douglass spent his honorable life defending human liberties, including his own. Born a slave in Talbot County, Maryland, Douglass was passed around between owners for most of his early life. He began learning to read at an early age from the white children in his neighborhoods and from Sophia Auld, the wife of his Baltimore owner, Hugh Auld. Douglass began reading newspapers at the age of twelve, helping to form the basis of his ideas of liberty at a young age. Constantly angering his owners through his courage and knowledge, he was shipped off to a rural farm run by a man know for “breaking slaves”. Here, at the age of sixteen, Frederick’s spirit was crushed until he finally fought back against his enemy. He won the fight and began planning his escape, eventually succeeding through the help of the Underground Railroad. He immediately joined abolitionist groups and began writing and making speeches. His autobiography, published in 1845, was a major success and his status as leading man for his numerous causes was established.

Notes

The memorial bust is placed on the grounds of the newly opened Frederick Douglass Isaac Myers Maritime Park. The park is part of the Living Classrooms project and is located at the site of the first African-American owned and operated shipyard in the United States. Douglass worked at these docks during his early years in Baltimore. The statue sits right on the dock and is constructed in sections. The artist Marc Andre Robinson created the work and it was installed in 2006. A second Douglass monument is located on the campus of Morgan State University.

Nearby

Links

Written by monumentcity

May 20th, 2009 at 10:33 am

Frederick Douglass Statue on Morgan State’s Campus

without comments

Hillen Road & E Cold Spring Lane on Morgan State’s campus

GPS: 39° 20′ 49.27″ N 76° 35′ 2.91″ W

History

The idea to erect a Frederick Douglass statue on the campus of Morgan State University was conceived in 1943. The notion was presented to and carried out by the Maryland Educational Association. Artist James E. Lewis was chosen to design the monument, an associate professor at the university, Lewis was the obvious choice for the project. By 1956 the memorial was completed and unveiled in front of the school’s Holmes Hall, a building named for Morgan’s former president Dwight O. W. Holmes.

Notes

The eight-foot tall bronze cast stands in a high traffic area of campus directly north of the school’s stadium. Douglass is shown in a dignified stance with a cane in his right hand (the cane given to him by Abraham Lincoln’s widow, Mary Todd). A second monument to the great orator can be found at the Frederick Douglass-Isaac Myers Maritime Park at Harbor East.

Nearby

Links

Written by monumentcity

May 20th, 2009 at 10:31 am

Boy Scout Statue in Hampden

without comments

Sisson Street & Wyman Park Drive (Street View)

GPS: 39° 19′ 17.54″ N 76° 37′ 40.88″ W

History

Dating back to 1937, this sculpture is by R. Tait McKenzie and is also known as the Ideal Boy Scout. It stands outside the Morris and John D. Schapiro Scout Service Center, headquarters of the Baltimore Area Council. McKenzie’s sculpture has been duplicated for more than thirty Boy Scout centers across the nation. A small version of this sculpture was originally crafted as a desktop statuette by McKenzie in 1914. Between 1914 and 1937, a total of five scouts served as models for the completion of the life-sized statue which is a composite of these individuals. The Boy Scouts are one arm of the worldwide scouting movement which was formed in 1907.

Notes

The re-purposed Stieff Silver building is across the street to the north, and it houses the Scout Shop of Baltimore City, along with other businesses and non-profits. Across from Stieff Silver is a section of the Jones Falls Trailhead, an excellent bike path which drops down a switchback to follow the Jones Falls along Old Falls Road. Or, you can cross the bridge to the west into Druid Hill Park, home of many monuments, sights and some great under-used bike paths.

Nearby

Links

Written by monumentcity

May 19th, 2009 at 10:50 am

Johns Hopkins Monument in Charles Village

without comments

N Charles Street & E 33rd Street (Street View)

GPS: 39° 19′ 41.02″ N 76° 37′ 4.55″ W

History

In 1873, Johns Hopkins died. In 1875, a university in his name was established, one of many institutions that would eventually use his moniker. A Quaker from a plantation in Virginia, Hopkins and his brothers first business was selling supplies from covered wagons in the Shenandoah Valley. Occasionally they traded goods for corn whiskey, repackaged the liquor, and sold it to Baltimoreans as Hopkins Best. After a series of businesses Hopkins eventually helped bankroll the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad during the company’s westward expansion, bailing the company out of debt several times and making himself a very wealthy man in the process. During and after the Civil War, Hopkins thrived as an investor and professional, becoming one of the richest men in American history.

Notes

The bust of Johns Hopkins, sculpted by Hans Schuler, rests atop a tall foundation and is flanked by two statues, one a young male and the other a youthful female. Originally located at North Charles Street & East 34th Street, the structure was moved a block south due to numerous automobile accidents attributed to its placement. Surrounded by lush vegetation, with the school’s campus behind, the monument presents a dignified view of an American icon.

Nearby

Links

Written by monumentcity

March 29th, 2009 at 3:24 pm

William H. Welch Statue at Johns Hopkins

without comments

In front of Shriver Hall on Johns Hopkins University’s main campus

GPS: 39° 19′ 36.46″ N 76° 37′ 12.50″ W

History

H. L. Mencken, once known as the Sage of Baltimore, wrote a 1935 Baltimore Sun article about William H Welch and his life of excess. According to Mencken, Welch had little or no concern with his own health, instead concentrating on the conditions of others. He chose study over sleep, food instead of diet, and meditation before activity. He was a career physician, having learned at Yale and in Germany, eventually becoming the first dean of the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. During his later career he was elected president of the National Academy of Sciences and the American Medical Association, accomplishments only trumped by his various appetites. William Welch was a beer for breakfast kind of guy, yet he was able to move the medical profession as far forward as anyone in his generation. He lived to be eighty-four years old.

Notes

To the left of Shriver Hall’s entrance, on Johns Hopkins University‘s main campus, the statue stands tall on it’s pedestal. To the memorial’s immediate left is the Isaiah Bowman Bust, with Daniel Coit Gilman’s monument only a few paces beyond that. Welch is posed with his right hand’s index finger pointing upward, as though he were making one final speech. Sidney Waugh created the structure and it was erected in 1957.

Nearby

Links

Written by monumentcity

March 20th, 2009 at 3:29 pm

Daniel Coit Gilman Statue at Johns Hopkins

without comments

In front of Shriver Hall on Johns Hopkins University’s main campus

GPS: 39° 19′ 36.43″ N 76° 37′ 13.58″ W

History

Asked in 1875 to be the first president of Johns Hopkins University, Daniel Coit Gilman left the campus of California University, where he was dean, and accepted his new post in the east. Gilman attended Yale and was a member of the secret society Skull and Bones. He is co-founder of the Russell Trust, the organization that funds Yale’s famous ambiguous association.

Gilman is highly regarded for his ability to assemble premiere scholars and teachers for his universities, establishing these schools as top academic institutions. He wrote several books, including the still-published Life of James Monroe. In 1898 he edited and wrote an introduction to Democracy in America, the classic volume by French author Alexis De Toqueville. In 1908, after a long and successful life, Daniel Coit Gilman passed away in the city of his birth, Norwich, Connecticut.

Notes

Flanked to the right of Johns Hopkins University’s Shriver Hall, the Gilman statue stands tall and regal. Installed in 1957, the monument shares its historic site with the Isaiah Bowman Bust and the William H Welch statue. The likeness of Gilman was designed by the artist Sidney Waugh.

Nearby

Links

Written by monumentcity

March 20th, 2009 at 10:40 am

Isaiah Bowman Bust at Johns Hopkins

without comments

Shriver Hall on Johns Hopkins University’s main campus

GPS: 39° 19′ 36.48″ N 76° 37′ 13.00″ W

History

Isaiah Bowman was born in Canada in 1878. His immense talent for Geography was recognized early in his life by his hometown teachers, and he eventually studied at Harvard and Yale. He taught at Yale for ten years and while there he wrote several scholarly pieces on physical terrain. In 1916 Bowman was named director of the American Geographical Society, serving in that post until 1935, when he became president of Johns Hopkins University. He was an adviser to Presidents Woodrow Wilson and Teddy Roosevelt during his illustrious career, and the true scope of his contributions to the world will likely be unknown until his personal diaries are made public.

Notes

Placed under the facade of Shriver Hall, the Bowman bust is difficult to locate at first glance. The statue is situated to the left of the Hall’s front door, hiding from unsuspecting eyes. Illuminated at night by lights, this tribute to one of the world’s great geographers greets students and concert goers daily. Laura Gardin Fraser, sculptor of the Lee and Jackson monument, created the statue, and it was dedicated in 1957.

Nearby

Links

Written by monumentcity

March 18th, 2009 at 11:20 am

Sidney Lanier Monument in Charles Village

without comments

3436 N Charles Street, Johns Hopkins University (Street View)

GPS: 39° 19′ 52.45″ N 76° 37′ 5.19″ W

History

Born in 1842, Sidney Lanier’s life was forever shaped by the Civil War. Upon graduating Oglethorpe College in Milledgeville, Georgia, the War Between the States broke out and Lanier enlisted in the Confederate Army. He was captured by Union soldiers near Wilmington, North Carolina, and placed at Point Lookout Prison in Saint Mary’s County, Maryland. Lookout was by far the worst Union POW camp, with bitter cold conditions and no barracks, the captured soldiers and civilians died by the scores.

Of the fifty thousand detainees, some four thousand perished, and countless others contracted tuberculosis. Lanier was not spared, and he left the jail skinny and emaciated, bound to suffer from consumption for the rest of his short life. Lanier wrote his only novel, Tiger Lilies, about his tumultuous time at Point Lookout.

After the Civil War he traveled extensively in search of a cure for his disease, eventually landing in Baltimore, where he was asked to fill the first flute chair in the newly formed Peabody Orchestra. In a letter to his wife, he expounds on the benefits of Charm City, explaining that they could “dwell in [this] beautiful city, among the great libraries, and [in the] midst of the music, the religion, and the art that we love–and I could write my books and be the man I wish to be.” He continued creating poetry and literary papers, writing some of his most loved pieces while in Baltimore.

Towards the end of his life, Lanier took a teaching position at Johns Hopkins University. He passed away in 1881 and is buried in Green Mount Cemetery. In 1942, a monument designed by Hans Schuler was dedicated in his honor.

Notes

The relief style monument depicts Lanier sitting tranquilly under a tree as the sun sets behind him. He is holding a pencil in his right hand and has a journal on his lap. His flute rests next to him on top of an open book. The bronze cast is set into a stone embankment, making this one of the more unique memorials in the city. There are two benches flanking the monument, and a stone path between them, allowing for an intimate view of the structure.

Nearby

Links

Written by monumentcity

March 17th, 2009 at 11:24 am