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Archive for the ‘Federal Hill’ Category

Our Fathers Saved Sundial on Federal Hill

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Location: Warren Avenue & Henry Street

Dedicated in 1933, the Our Fathers Saved Sundial was created in honor of union Civil War casualties. The inscription reads: “In memory of the Grand Army of the Republic by the Daughters of the Union Veterans of the Civil War 1861-1865.” Situated at the southern end of Federal Hill, near Baltimore’s Inner Harbor. Monuments to war heroes Samuel Smith and George Armistead are placed in the park as well.

Written by monumentcity

June 16th, 2009 at 9:22 am

George Armistead Monument on Federal Hill

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Federal Hill, Key Highway and Covington Street (Street View)

GPS: 39° 16′ 49.06″ N 76° 36′ 29.23″ W

History

George Armistead was commander of Fort McHenry during the Battle of Baltimore. One of five brothers to serve in the War of 1812, he rapidly distinguished himself as a courageous soldier. After the Americans took Fort George from the British in 1813, Armistead delivered the captured British flags to President James Madison, prompting his appointment as commander of Fort McHenry. He is most famous for ordering the creation of the Star-Spangled Banner, the muse of our national anthem. Goerge Armistead died in 1818, at 38 years of age and is buried at Old Saint Paul’s Cemetery. This marble monument was dedicated in 1882 with G. Metzger serving as architect.

Notes

One of two memorials to Armistead, the other being at Fort McHenry, this monument sits atop Federal Hill overlooking the Inner Harbor. The Samuel Smith monument and a large American flag stand nearby, along with a nice park and playground. This is the site of much activity during the warmer months and offers an excellent vantage point of the city.

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Written by monumentcity

March 2nd, 2009 at 10:19 am

Major General Samuel Smith Monument on Federal Hill

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Federal Hill, Key Highway and Covington Street (Street View)

GPS: 39° 16′ 49.00″ N 76° 36′ 30.20″ W

History

Samuel Smith (1752-1839) served as major general of the Maryland militias in the War of 1812 and commanded the city’s defenses in the Battle of Baltimore. Smith served two terms as Mayor of Baltimore from 1835 to 1838 and served in Congress for forty years. His country mansion was located slightly west of the present site of Lake Montebello. This monument was dedicated on July 4, 1918 and is another piece by sculptor Hans Schuler. From 1918 to 1953 the statue was located in Wyman Park at Charles and 29th Streets. It was moved in 1953 to Pratt Street and Light Street and moved again in 1970 to its current location.

Notes

Situated on Federal Hill next to the George Armistead Monument, the historic location offers an excellent view of the Inner Harbor. The Pride Memorial stands at the foot of the hill.

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Written by monumentcity

March 2nd, 2009 at 10:15 am

The Pride Memorial at the Inner Harbor

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Key Highway and S Shore Promenade at Rash Field (Street View)

GPS: 39° 16′ 53.62″ N 76° 36′ 30.08″ W

History

The Pride of Baltimore was a reproduction of a Baltimore clipper topsail schooner named The Chausseur which fought in the War of 1812 under privateer Thomas Boyle. The Pride was lost at sea in a micro-burst squall with her captain and three others in May of 1986. She had been commissioned in 1975, was built alongside the Science Center, and was launched by Barbara Mikulski in 1977. A Pride of Baltimore II was launched in 1988. Monument dedicated in 1992.

Notes

Located at the east end of Rash Field, which lies on the south side of the Inner Harbor. The Rusty Scupper restaurant is nearby and the mound of Federal Hill looms immediately to the south. Currently occupying Rash Field to the west is the Trapeze School of Baltimore and sand volleyball courts. The Pride Memorial itself is composed of a central wooden mast held in place by guide wires, a set of inscribed plaques, and an etching of the ship.

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Written by monumentcity

February 20th, 2009 at 9:55 am