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Archive for the ‘Fountain’ Category

General Alfred E. Booth Fountain

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This fountain is located at Port Discovery in downtown Charm City. The fountain was donated in 1906 by General Alfred E. Booth, one of Baltimore’s prominent businessmen during the 19th century. It resembles the SPCA drinking fountain that once stood in Monument Square next to the Battle Monument. There are two markers placed nearby that are identical in style but commemorate different events. One memorializes the commission of Centre Market and the other summarizes the Great Fire of 1904.

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November 7th, 2009 at 3:48 pm

Sea Urchin Statue in Mount Vernon

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N Charles Street & E Centre Street (Street View)

GPS: 39° 17′ 48.41″ N 76° 36′ 56.33″ W

History

Edward Berge was one of Baltimore’s prominent sculptors. An attendee of the William Rinehart School of Sculpture, Berge continued his education in Paris under Auguste Rodin. He created numerous monuments throughout the city and generally works in a realist style. He is, however, most well known for his carefree and playful garden figures. The original Sea Urchin, now located at Johns Hopkins University, was created by Berge in 1924, and installed at Mount Vernon Place in a fountain in front of the Washington Monument.

For over thirty years it stood in the south park, until 1961, when is was moved to Johns Hopkins University’s Homewood campus and replaced with an enlarged version. Frederick Huber wished to memorialize the local sculptor by having a larger more monumental Sea Urchin cast, one that would fit in better with its grand surroundings. Chosen to execute the reproduction was Edward’s son, Henry Berge.

Notes

The enlarged Sea Urchin was the subject of consistent vandalism for years after its installation. On various occasions the statue was moved during the night, only to be found in some strange area of the city the following day. Sometimes the memorial would be dressed in people’s clothing, confronting residents and tourists with a ghostly air. Eventually the pranks ended and the Urchin was granted the peace it deserved. The sculpture resides in Charm City’s oldest wishing well, standing guard over the town’s hopes and dreams.

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May 15th, 2009 at 1:42 pm

Fallsway Fountain Monument

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E Biddle Street & Guilford Avenue (Street View)

GPS: 39° 18′ 12.00″ N 76° 36′ 42.60″ W

History

The Jones Falls Expressway is a mostly above ground thoroughfare connecting the northern suburbs of Baltimore to downtown. Created around 1960, the motorway is the city’s main north-south artery. The highway project started where the old Fallsway system ended. The Fallsway was a massive public works project that took place between 1911-1916, consisting of elevated downtown roads that passed over the Jones Falls waterway. The stream, impounded at Lake Roland in north Baltimore, eventually empties into the Inner Harbor.

The Fallsway ended dangerous overflows onto city streets, making travel in downtown safer and more efficient. Parallel to the creation of this roadway, a new sewage and water system was built. Before the government opened the works, they arranged a tour of the operations by automobiles, impressing the local media. James Harry Preston, who served as Mayor from 1911-1919, spearheaded the effort. A monument, sculpted by Hans Schuler, was erected to commemorate the Fallsway.

Notes

Installed at Eager Street and the Fallsway, in 1915, the fountain was re-located by Mayor Theodore McKeldin in 1967. After comparing postcards from the early 20th century, it appears that the monument was only moved a few blocks north during the expressway’s creation.

The statue is of a woman holding a shield in one arm and a vase, that once poured water, in the other. She is sitting atop a pedestal inscribed with the names of commission members involved in the Fallsway’s development and completion. The pool at the structure’s front is now filled with dirt, the fountain long since operational. Theodore Wells Pietsch served as architect.

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April 22nd, 2009 at 8:17 pm

Sea Urchin Statue at Johns Hopkins University

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Decker Gardens at Johns Hopkins University’s Homewood campus

GPS: 39° 19′ 46.79″ N 76° 37′ 20.60″ W

History

In 1926, Edward Berge‘s Sea Urchin, was installed in front of the Lafayette Monument at Mount Vernon Place. Thirty-four years later his son, Henry Berge, created a larger copy of the statue, replacing the original. The smaller cast was then donated by Frank R. Huber, the man financially responsible for the 7’10” reproduction, to Paul M. Higinbotham, who gave the sculpture to Johns Hopkins University.

Notes

The sea urchin sits inside a lily pond on the front lawn of the school president’s home. The man made lagoon features a fountain at the base of the statue, and is dedicated to trustee Alonzo G. Decker, Jr. Just south of the historic Homewood House Museum, the Decker gardens provide a remote hideaway on campus grounds. A bench at the edge of the park offers a perfect seat for sunset watching.

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April 5th, 2009 at 4:09 pm

Katyn Memorial in Harbor East

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Location

Roundabout at Aliceanna Street and S President Street (Street View)

GPS: 39° 16′ 59.37″ N 76° 36′ 6.05″ W

History

Dedicated on November 19, 2000, the Katyn Memorial commemorates the 22,000 estimated Polish military officers, police, intellectuals and civilian prisoners of war executed by the NKVD, Stalin’s secret police at the Katyn forest and other Soviet detainment camps in 1940. The Soviet government officially denied the massacre ever took place until 1990. The monument also depicts significant figures from other points in Polish history, re-conceptualizing the destructive flame as the transformation and renewal of a people. Artist: Andrzei Pitynski.

Notes

This monument stands a majestic fourty-four feet tall at a geographic hub connecting the Inner Harbor, the commercial and residential revitalization projects at Harbor East and Fells Point. Construction is on-going in the area. The old President Street Station was once nearby (later turned into a Civil War Museum), connecting passengers on the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad (B&O) to the Philadelphia, Wilmington & Baltimore Railroad (PW&B).

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February 20th, 2009 at 9:45 am