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The Patterson Park Pagoda

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During the War of 1812, as British troops approached Baltimore aiming to eliminate the bothersome privateer port, Commodore John Rodgers organized his large group of local volunteer soldiers at Hampstead Hill (now part of Patterson Park). Known as Rodgers’ Bastion, the fortified position provided a perfect vantage point during the British invasion of September 1814, allowing the Commodore to see the English flotilla coming up the harbor as well as the foot soldiers marching from North Point. The intelligent organization and courageous execution of Charm City’s defenders resulted in American victory. The Star-Spangled Banner was written by Francis Scott Key during the campaign.

In 1892 Charles H. Latrobe (grandson of Benjamin Henry Latrobe) saw the completion of his monumental Patterson Park Pagoda at the top of Hampstead Hill. The four story oriental style tower is made of fabricated iron supports, wood and glass. The ornamental building has three observation decks with a spiral staircase leading to each. The perspective from the top deck is one of the best in Baltimore, with views of Canton, the Inner Harbor and downtown.

In 1914, during the Centennial Celebration of the Battle of Baltimore, two monuments were placed directly in front of the Victorian pagoda. J. Maxwell Miller’s Star-Spangled Banner Centennial Monument depicts two school children holding a memorial scroll and the Rodgers’ Bastion Memorial Cannon commemorates the land battle lead by Commodore Rodgers. Nearby is a row of five cannon representing the War of 1812 fortification.

The Patterson Park Pagoda was completely restored in 2002 and is operated by the Friends of Patterson Park. The observatory is open from noon to six on Sundays from April to October. The historic location is one of the most engaging in Charm City, offering layers of historical value and intrigue.

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Written by monumentcity

June 6th, 2011 at 10:01 am

WWI Flagstaff Memorial in Patterson Park

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Location: S Linwood Avenue & Eastern Avenue

This memorial plaque was affixed to a flagpole at Patterson Park in 1923. The World War I marker is just a few steps away from Hans Schuler’s General Pulaski Monument, a majestic sculpture honoring one of America’s, and Poland’s, greatest war heroes.

Written by monumentcity

July 6th, 2009 at 9:13 am

Baltimore’s Hiker Statue

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E Fayette Street & N Lakewood Avenue (Street View)

GPS: 39° 17′ 40.57″ N 76° 34′ 45.60″ W

History

Theo Alice Ruggles Kitson is a Massachusetts born sculptor known for her dignified realist style. The student and husband of artist Henry Hudson Kitson, Theo studied in Paris and was recognized for her work by the age of nineteen. Her most famous work is The Hiker, a monument to soldiers who fought in the Spanish-American War. The conflict occurred at the end of the 19th century, and was waged in Cuba, the Philippines and Guam. Teddy Roosevelt and his Rough Riders were crucial in the Cuban campaign, fighting in the important Battle of San Juan Hill. The engagements ended in four months with the United States winning easily. The side-by-side fighting of Northerners and Southerners helped heal the wounds opened during the American Civil War. Mrs. Kitson was commissioned to create over fifty Hiker statues during her lifetime, memorializing the common soldier throughout the country. She passed away in 1932.

Notes

Unveiled in June of 1943, the monument stands in the median between eastbound and westbound Fayette Street. A cannon rests just outside the small fence surrounding the statue. The hiker is carrying a musket in both hands, a bag over his right shoulder and canteen over his other. It appears the dedication plaques are missing from the base of the structure. Patterson Park is two blocks south.

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Written by monumentcity

April 29th, 2009 at 8:11 pm

General Casimir Pulaski Monument in Patterson Park

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S Linwood Avenue & Eastern Avenue (Street View)

GPS: 39° 17′ 13.47″ N 76° 34′ 36.93″ W

History

After years of fighting Russian occupiers in defense of Poland, Kazimierz Pulaski was eventually forced from his homeland. His role in forming the Bar Confederation, the group responsible for Poland’s first uprising, had cost him is freedom. Sentenced to death, he fled to France where he was recruited by General La Fayette to fight in the American Revolution.

Known as the “father of the American cavalry” for his courageous and intuitive techniques, the soldier of fortune was a friend of Ben Franklin. In 1777, at the Battle of Brandywine, he saved George Washington’s life and was promoted to brigadier general. Due to his inability to speak English he relinquished this post and became America’s “Commander of the Horse,” a position he held until his untimely death. The magnificent relief sculpture depicts General Pulaski and Captain Paul Bentalou leading their cavalry at the Siege of Savannah. Behind the two men are more soldiers and horses in full battle march. Pulaski was shot in the thigh during the fight and died two days later.

Notes

Placed at the southeast corner of Patterson Park, the Pulaski Monument is an imposing combination of art and architecture. The area surrounding the structure is circled by a fence and a long walkway leads to the memorial. Commissioned in 1929, by the General Pulaski Monument Committee, the memorial faced a series of set-backs before it’s final completion in 1951. After collecting and saving funds, primarily from the Polish community, the project stalled when the bank, where the money was kept, went under during the Great Depression. Then, during WWII, bronze became difficult to obtain and inflation increased the cost beyond the estimated amount. It wasn’t until the State of Maryland and the City of Baltimore stepped in to provide additional financial support that the sculpture was completed. Restoration of the monument took place in 2002. Hans Schuler created the relief with A. C. Radziszewski acting as architect.

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Written by monumentcity

April 11th, 2009 at 4:23 pm

Conradin Kreutzer Bust in Patterson Park

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Gough Street & S Patterson Park Avenue, just inside the park

GPS: 39° 17′ 17.78″ N 76° 35′ 1.54″ W

History

Given to the City by the United Singers of Baltimore in 1915, the Conradin Kreutzer statue was won, by the group, in a singing contest that same year. Saengerfest, a German cultural event American communities have been celebrating since 1849, focuses primarily on choral performances. In 1900, the same group won first prize, receiving the Wagner bust now placed in Druid Hill Park. Both pieces were created by R P Golde, a German sculptor who lived in New York City.

Notes

Following the trail south from the observatory, the Kreutzer monument is about one city block on the right. The inscription on the pedestal’s front reads: “Conradin Kreutzer, First City Prize won the the United Singers at the 24th National Saengerfest.” The winning song was written by F Langer.

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Written by monumentcity

April 10th, 2009 at 3:55 pm

Star-Spangled Banner Centennial Monument

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E Pratt Street & S Patterson Park Avenue, next to the Pagoda

GPS: 39° 17′ 23.74″ N 76° 35′ 0.99″ W

History

The Centennial Celebration of the Star-Spangled Banner was a week long event held in Baltimore in 1914. The festivities marked the city’s successful defense of it’s borders during the War of 1812. The ceremonies included parades, balls, parties, performances and numerous monument dedications. J. Maxwell Miller, a close friend and colleague of artists Edward Berge and Hans Schuler, produced the Star-Spangled Banner Memorial for the occasion. The sculpture depicts two school children holding a scroll that reads: “To commemorate the centennial of the writing of the Star-Spangled Banner, the pupils of the public schools of Baltimore have erected this memorial upon Hampstead Hill where in September, 1814, the citizen soldiers of Maryland stood ready to sacrifice their lives in defense of their homes and their country.”

Notes

Situated in the vicinity of Commodore John Rodgers’ headquarters during the Battle of Baltimore, the monument stands next to the Pagoda on historic Hampstead Hill.

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Written by monumentcity

April 9th, 2009 at 3:58 pm

Rodgers’ Bastion Memorial Cannon in Patterson Park

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E Pratt Street & S Patterson Park Avenue, next to the Pagoda

GPS: 39° 17′ 23.45″ N 76° 35′ 1.62″ W

History

In 1814, after the sacking of Washington, British troops marched on Baltimore, attacking by sea and by land. Britain wished to put an end to American privateering, and considered Baltimore’s port to be a haven for pirates. They attempted to sail past Fort McHenry while sending ground troops through what was then known as North Point. The two-pronged attack was doomed to fail. Commodore John Rodgers, a famous Navy General, was in command of ground troops stationed on Hampstead Hill in Patterson Park. He had over 12,000 volunteers and 100 cannons, strategically placed, ready to defend Charm City. On the way into Baltimore, British General Robert Ross, who helped defeat Napoleon, was shot and killed. The loss of field leadership coupled with bad weather and little support from their flotilla forced the British into an early retreat. The flag still hung at Fort McHenry the next day, and the Star-Spangled Banner was written. America was safe, and the defense of Baltimore had been successful. The cannon monument was dedicated in 1914 during the centennial celebration of the War of 1812 and the Battle of Baltimore.

Notes

Just off the northwest entrance to Patterson Park, the monument stands below the pagoda. The Star-Spangled Banner Centennial Memorial rests a few paces northeast and several more cannons flank the area. The location provides an impressive view of the park and city beyond.

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Written by monumentcity

April 8th, 2009 at 4:05 pm