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Archive for the ‘Religion’ Category

Baltimore’s Most Holy Redeemer Cemetery

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Baltimore’s Most Holy Redeemer Cemetery was established on May 3, 1882. The Redemptorist burying ground is situated in north Baltimore and is bound by Belair and Moravia Roads above Herring Run Park. The Redemptorist order is a Catholic congregation founded in 1732 by Saint Alphonsus Maria de Liguori, the Italian author, philosopher and bishop. The graveyard was created to serve the city’s Saint Michael the Archangel and Saint James the Less parishes. Over the years other local congregations acquired sections of the burial ground, forming a rich cross section of Baltimore’s catholic history.

The centerpiece of the cemetery, the Francis E. Tormey designed chapel, was payed for by local businessman and politician Frank Furst. Completed in 1917, the Furst Memorial Chapel was once used for ceremonies and is currently under consideration for renovation. Mr. and Mrs. Furst are entombed within along with 61 Redemptorists that were transferred from a graveyard in Ilchester, Maryland.

Babe Ruth’s mother is buried in section G-2 near Priest Circle. A new tombstone was recently placed on her previously unmarked grave. She died in 1912 of tuberculosis while her son was still a teenager. In section W lies the remains of Henry Gunther, supposedly the last man to die in World War I. Gunther was killed in France on November 11, 1918 at 10:59 in the morning. His grave consists of an angel on a plinth and detailed marker that was installed in 2010.

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Written by monumentcity

August 9th, 2012 at 7:34 am

Mother Seton Statue and Saint Mary’s Chapel

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Mother Seton Statue Saint Mary’s Chapel Saint Mary’s Chapel Orchard Street Church

In the Seton Hill Historic District, just a few blocks west of the Washington Monument, is the Mother Seton House and Saint Mary’s Chapel. Elizabeth Ann Seton, the first native-born U.S. citizen to be canonized by the Catholic Church, moved into the house with her five children on June 16, 1808. On the same day, French born architect Maximilian Godefroy’s Saint Mary’s Chapel was dedicated by America’s first bishop, John Carroll, in the adjoining yard. A year later Mrs. Seton would move her family to Emmitsburg, MD where she eventually started the country’s first free school for girls and a thriving Catholic community. This statue sits just inside the fence to the right of the Mother Seton House at 600 North Paca Street and was designed by the St. Jude Liturgical Arts Studio.

Saint Mary’s Chapel has been operating as a religious institution for over 200 years and is incredibly well-maintained. Designed by Maximilian Godefroy, who also created the city’s Battle Monument and First Unitarian Church, the humble structure is deceptively elegant. Surrounding the property is a large peaceful park where the seminary once stood, adding a countryside context to the historic site.

Two blocks west at 512 Orchard Street is the Orchard Street Church. Founded in 1825 by Truman Pratt, the church was used extensively as an Underground Railroad stop. A near mile long tunnel can apparently be toured by appointment.

Written by monumentcity

August 20th, 2010 at 10:06 am

McKim Free School

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The McKim Free School was established in 1821 with a $600.00 endowment provided by merchant John McKim. The Baltimore Quaker died in 1819, leaving detailed instructions for his two sons, Isaac and William, to carry out. The McKim brothers hired the design team of William Key Howard, son of John Eager Howard, and William F. Small, who trained under Benjamin Henry Latrobe for two years, to create the Greek Revival style building located at 1232 E. Baltimore Street. Opening in 1833, the school was Charm City’s first free school, offering much needed education to disadvantaged children. The building is an imitation of the Temple of Theseus in Athens. The Friends Meeting House, the oldest religious building in Baltimore, is just around the corner. The two buildings combine to form the McKim Community Association campus.

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January 9th, 2010 at 9:13 am

James Cardinal Gibbons Birthplace Marker

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The James Cardinal Gibbons birthplace marker resides at the east side of War Memorial Plaza in downtown Baltimore. Gibbons was born in Charm City at this location in 1834, the tablet commemorating the occasion. Archdiocese of the Baltimore Catholic Church from 1877 until his death, the Cardinal was famous for fighting for worker’s rights, defending the vast numbers of Catholic laborers during the industrial period of America at the centuries turn. His book, The Faith of Our Fathers is an enduring success, and continues to be his hallmark statement. A statue of Gibbons sits outside of America’s first Cathedral, the Basilica of the Assumption.

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July 12th, 2009 at 6:28 am

Mother Catherine McAuley Statue

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Born near Dublin, Ireland, in 1778, Mother Catherine McAuley dedicated her storied life to helping others. A devote catholic, McAuley was challenged when, after her parents died, she was sent to live with anti-catholic relatives. This difficult period in her life only strengthened her convictions and she began establishing the Sisters of Mercy. The organization’s goal was to aid suffering families and children as well as training women for employment. When Catherine was in her mid-twenties a Quaker family offered her residence in their home. The family grew to adore her and when they passed away they left their entire estate to their adopted daughter. In 1827, McAuley used this money to set up her first House of Mercy. In 1990, Pope John Paul II declared her venerable.

The Mother Catherine McAuley Monument in front of Baltimore’s Mercy Hospital was installed on November 11, 2000. The tablet and statue commemorate the 125th anniversary of the Sisters of Mercy.

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June 29th, 2009 at 7:16 am

Peace Cross at the Cathedral of the Incarnation

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N Charles Street & University Parkway (Street View)

GPS: 39° 19′ 59.89″ N 76° 37′ 2.64″ W

History

Dedicated on May 18, 1920, this large Celtic-style cross stands on the grounds of the Cathedral of the Incarnation, just north of Hopkins Homewood Campus. The monument, also known as Victory Cross, is dedicated to the memory of lives lost in WWI. Across the street is the Confederate Women of MD Monument.

Notes

The monument is hidden from immediate view by some trees and resides in an area named Clover Hill, according to a Maryland Historical Society plaque found nearby. Around 1714, this region was part of a 210-acre grant by Lord Baltimore to Charles Merryman, whose descendents lived and farmed here until 1869. In 1909, the site was purchased by the Episcopal Church.

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May 18th, 2009 at 11:11 am

Martin Luther Monument at Lake Montebello

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Hillen Road & E 32nd Street (Street View)

GPS: 39° 19′ 39.52″ N 76° 35′ 19.59″ W

History

Unveiled on October 31, 1936, the Martin Luther Monument is the work of Baltimore’s Hans Schuler. After studying at the Rinehart School of Sculpture, Schuler traveled to France with fellow artists Edward Berge and J. Maxwell Miller to continue his studies. In 1901, he won the Salon Gold Medal in Paris, the first American to do so. One of the city’s premiere sculptors, Schuler was director of the Maryland Institute College of Art from 1935 to 1951, resigning a year before his death.

A gift of a prominent local jeweler, Arthur Wallenhorst, the 18-foot tall statue of Luther once greeted visitors at the Mount Royal entrance to Druid Hill Park. In 1959 it was moved to it’s current spot over-looking Lake Montebello. A second statue of the German protestant, also by Schuler, was erected in 1947 at the The Lutheran Theological Seminary in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania.

Notes

Situated in a small park on the southwest side of the lake, Martin Luther’s likeness gestures sternly with right hand raised. Two benches once flanked the statue, but only their supports remain. Baltimore’s Commission for Historical & Architectural Preservation has been maintaining the monument since 1980.

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April 15th, 2009 at 8:04 pm

Pope John Paul II Monument at the Basilica

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W Franklin Street and N Charles Street (Street View)

GPS: 39° 17′ 42.19″ N 76° 36′ 56.38″ W

History

Commemorates Pope John Paul II’s 1995 visit to Charm City. The trip came at the invitation of William Keeler, who was elevated to Cardinal by the pontiff. The sculpture is based on a photo of the Pope arriving in Baltimore, embracing two Baltimore children. The prayer garden is also dedicated to religious freedom and ecumenism. Artist: Joseph Sheppard; garden designed by Scott Rykeil. Once the site of the historic Rochambeau apartments which were demolished to create this contemplative space. Ground-breaking ceremony held April 11, 2008.

Notes

Located in the prayer garden at the north-eastern corner of the Basilica of the Assumption, also known as Baltimore Cathedral. Across the street is the First Unitarian Church of Baltimore, which bears a uniquely beautiful facade of its own. A high-energy location as traffic flows in from the east and south.

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February 20th, 2009 at 10:02 am

James Cardinal Gibbons Statue at the Basilica

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W Mulberry Street and Cathedral Street (Street View)

GPS: 39° 17′ 39.60″ N 76° 36′ 58.20″ W

History

Dedicated Dec. 17, 1967, this monument depicts Cardinal James Gibbons (1834-1921), Archbishop of Baltimore. Sculptors: Harold Schaller and Betti Richard. Gibbons served as a chaplain at Fort McHenry during the Civil War. Gibbons was the second American to be elevated to the office of cardinal. Notable for his support of the labor movement. There’s another monument dedicated to him in Washington, DC. Gibbons is buried below the Cathedral.

Notes

The monument is located within the gate at the Baltimore Basilica, in the southwest corner, diagonally across the property from the papal prayer garden. Gate is open during the day, with a ramp and staircase. The monument’s inscription describes him as an “exemplary citizen” and “friend of humanity.” Enoch Pratt Free Library faces Gibbons across Cathedral Street.

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February 20th, 2009 at 9:58 am