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Brooks Robinson Statue at Camden Yards

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Washington Boulevard and W Camden Street (Street View)

GPS: 39° 17′ 6.42″ N 76° 37′ 22.63″ W

Brooks Robinson played his entire baseball career with the Baltimore Orioles, winning the MVP of the 1970 World Series. Considered the greatest defensive third baseman of all time, Brooks won 16 gold gloves during his 23 years in Major League Baseball. He was invited to 18 All-Star games and won the American League MVP award after the 1964 season. Brooks was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1983.

This statue was unveiled on October 22, 2011 next to Oriole Park at Camden Yards. Oddly, the bronze likeness was not placed along side the Babe Ruth Statue on stadium grounds. Orioles owner Peter Angelos never offered the location and didn’t even show up to the ceremony. Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake was also absent without reason. The statue was privately instigated and funded by the former CEO of Crown Central Petroleum Henry Rosenberg.

The Maryland born Joseph Sheppard was chosen to execute the Oriole great’s monument. Sheppard created the Pope John Paul II statue and the Flame at the Holocaust Memorial. He also painted the mural of five panels inside Police Headquarters. Working out of his studios in Pietrasanta, Italy and Baltimore City, Sheppard has created a substantial body of work. The artist has reached a level of success achieved by few Baltimore artists. Architect: Richard Jones of Mahan Rykiel Associates.

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Written by monumentcity

March 27th, 2012 at 7:58 am

Druid Hill’s Memorial Pool

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While biking through Druid Hill Park I stumbled upon a large public pool filled with dirt and grass. An information tablet, though nearly aged beyond readability, indicates that the strange oasis is a memorial to the struggles of racial segregation and those that endured its hardships. During the first half of the 20th century Druid Hill Park operated under strict laws of separation, blacks and whites assigned to their own swimming and tennis facilities.

Pool no. 2 was the only outdoor public swimming area in Baltimore for African-Americans. Standout athletes like Connie Boyd refined their abilities at the well-attended and safe facility. By June of 1956 the city’s parks were fully integrated. The memorial landscape was designed by artist Joyce J. Scott.

Written by monumentcity

September 5th, 2010 at 8:37 am

Bell Tower at Stadium Place

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Built in 2006, and also known as Thanksgiving Place Labyrinth, the Bell Tower at Stadium Place was a joint project between the Govans Ecumenical Development Corporation and the TKF Foundation, “a private grant-making foundation” involved in a civic development project called “Open Spaces, Sacred Places,” integrating meditative green spaces in the midst of bustling urban locations.

The Bell Tower stands slightly west of the former entrance gates of two razed Baltimore sports stadiums. In 1922, Municipal Stadium (or Baltimore Stadium) was completed, hosting college and professional football, as well as baseball. The first of its kind in Charm City, Old Municipal helped attract solid professional sporting events to the area. By 1950, Old Municipal made way for Memorial Stadium, a larger and more modern facility. The monumental structure helped attract the American League’s Orioles in 1954. Memorial Stadium is the former location of another significant Baltimore monument, the Memorial Urn. The urn, which contains soil from military cemeteries around the world, was moved to Camden Yards.

The Bell Tower park at Stadium Place also features a stone labyrinth on the ground, surrounded on one side by a white wooden structure, trees, flowering gardens and benches. Nearby is the state’s largest YMCA and the retirement community called Stadium Place. There is also an all volunteer-built playground behind the YMCA on 33rd and Ellerslie. When a fire burned most of the playground, volunteers assembled once again to rebuild it, a testament to the civic spirit of area residents.

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Written by monumentcity

May 25th, 2009 at 9:12 am

Posted in All Posts,Sports

Memorial Stadium Urn at Camden Yards

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S Eutaw Street & W Lee Street (Street View)

GPS: 39° 16′ 55.96″ N 76° 37′ 14.29″ W

History

Memorial Stadium was completed in 1950. The outdoor professional sports arena was a renovation of the old Baltimore (or Municipal) Stadium that was built, in 1922, on 33rd Street in Waverly. The north Baltimore site was primarily the home of the city’s football clubs until 1944 when Orioles Park, an all wood framed structure nearby that housed the baseball team, burned to the ground completely, prompting the Orioles to move into the facility up the street. The larger stadium interested Major League Baseball, with it’s capacity for crowds in excess of 20,000, helping Baltimore finally receive a full charter franchise. Six years later the re-construction was complete and the new park was officially opened as the home of the Orioles and the National Football league’s Colts. In 1976, after the conclusion of a Colts-Steelers football game a single engine plane crashed into the upper deck. The pilot was apparently buzzing the stadium, but his approach was too low. No one was hurt in the incident.

The front facade of the stadium was a memorial to the Veterans of both World Wars. Dedicated in 1954, the edifice was nearly saved during the razing of the structure, but was finally taken down in 2002. The resulting materials from the demolition were used to create an artificial reef in the Chesapeake Bay. The military veterans memorial was moved to the southern side of Oriole Park at Camden Yards. It consists of an urn on pedestal and a large sloped wall displaying the message once inscribed on the old memorial. The urn contains soil from military cemeteries around the world. The monument was rededicated on March 31, 2003, as part of the Orioles opening day ceremonies.

Notes

The old ballpark’s home in Waverly is now the site of Stadium Place, a complex containing multiple apartment buildings for seniors and the states largest YMCA. A memorial Bell Tower has been erected, along with an Egyptian-style pergola, just slightly west of the stadium’s original front gates.

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Written by monumentcity

May 22nd, 2009 at 10:25 am

Johnny Unitas Statue at Ravens Stadium

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W Hamburg Street & Russell Street (Street View)

GPS: 39° 16′ 45.09″ N 76° 37′ 19.89″ W

History

Johnny Unitas was one of the greatest American football players of all time. When he retired from the league, in 1974, he held practically every record for quarterbacks, finishing his career with 290 touchdowns and over 40,000 yards passing. After attending Louisville University, Unitas was drafted by his hometown Pittsburgh Steelers, but did not make the team. He eventually landed at a tryout for the Baltimore Colts and was asked to join the organization. That following NFL season when the Colts starting quarterback went down he was inserted in to the starting lineup, and ended up winning the MVP award. The next year he led the team to their first of back-to-back championships in what sports historians call the greatest game ever played. Unitas died of heart attack on September 11, 2002.

Notes

The fourteen-foot tall monument depicts Unitas in a throwing motion, seemingly heaving a long pass down field. Erected at the north entrance of Ravens Stadium, the statue sits in the middle of Unitas Plaza. Giant posters of the legendary quarterback flank the ticket gates on either side of the bronze likeness. 290 replicas of the sculpture, each standing 21 inches tall, were created as well, one for each touchdown Unitas threw during his professional career. Dedicated on October 20, 2002, the statue is the creation of artist Frederick Kail. A slightly smaller Unitas memorial, also made by Kail, is situated at the Louisville University football stadium.

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Written by monumentcity

May 21st, 2009 at 10:28 am

Creator’s Game Lacrosse Monument

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113 W University Parkway next to Homewood Field (Street View)

GPS: 39° 20′ 5.20″ N 76° 37′ 17.90″ W

History

Since 1983, sculptor Jud Hartmann has focused his work on the The Woodland Tribes of the Northeast – The Iroquoian and Algonkians series. These limited edition pieces are on display at Hartmann’s Blue Hill, Maine gallery. He has cast over fifty works in this style, one of which stands outside the Lacrosse Museum at Johns Hopkins University. Dehontshihgwa’es or Creator’s Game consists of two Iroquois Indians playing lacrosse, one stealing a pass intended for the other. The monument was dedicated in 1992.

Notes

On the base of the sixteen foot tall structure an inscription reads: “The game of Lacrosse was given by the Creator to the Ho-de-no-saunee (Iroquois) and other Native American people many ages ago. It is from the Iroquois that the modern game most directly descends. May this sculpture forever honor the Iroquois and the origins of Lacrosse.” The monument stands in front of The Lacrosse Museum at Johns Hopkins University directly to the right of Homewood Field.

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March 15th, 2009 at 10:29 am

On The Trail Statue in Clifton Park

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N Rose Street & Indian Drive in Clifton Park (Street View)

GPS: 39° 19′ 18.54″ N 76° 34′ 55.30″ W

History

A fine example of Edward Berge‘s numerous pieces erected in Baltimore City, On The Trail displays his realist style. Berge was one of the original seven students at the Rinehart School of Sculpture along with friend and colleague Hans Schuler. Standing over seven feet tall the Indian statue gazes steadily over Clifton Park, a terrain once owned and farmed by Johns Hopkins. The land housed National Guard Troops during the riots that followed Martin Luther King Jr’s assassination in 1968, and over a century before was a staging ground for Union Generals during the Civil War. The sculpture garden and lake no longer exist, however, rolling hills and majestic antique buildings still dominate the landscape, and On The Trail remains, more than one hundred years since its installation.

Notes

The monument stands just south of Lake Montebello between the 8th and 9th holes of Clifton Park Golf Course. You might not notice it at first glance, but this monument has an inscription at its base which has been covered up by a bush. However, if you crawl head-first under the bush, you’ll be able to read the plague beneath which bears the official monument title, “ON THE TRAIL,” along with artist info and dedication dates.

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Written by monumentcity

March 3rd, 2009 at 10:35 am

Babe Ruth Statue at Camden Yards

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S Eutaw Street and W Camden Street (Street View)

GPS: 39° 17′ 5.98″ N 76° 37′ 14.48″ W

Also known as “Babe’s Dream”

History

George Herman “Babe” Ruth was born in Baltimore’s Pigtown neighborhood in his grandparent’s home on February 6, 1895. He eventually was sent to Saint Mary’s Industrial School to learn the textile trade. Ruth played catcher and pitcher for the school creating attention with local scouts. He was signed by Jack Dunn to the then-minor league Baltimore Orioles in 1914. The Babe got his nickname when Dunn, who had become George’s legal guardian in order to sign him, was seen by his team with the young baseball player. The Oriole veterans dubbed him ‘Jack’s newest babe’, and the name stuck. On July 9, 1914, he was traded to the Boston Red Sox. This statue was dedicated in 1998 and is by sculptor Susan Luery and New Arts Foundry in Hampden.

Notes

“Babe’s Dream” resides in a plaza south of Eutaw and Camden, in the northwest corner of Camden Yards. Also in the courtyard are a number of waist-high numerical sculptures commemorating famous ballplayers. The building to the immediate east of the plaza was once Camden Station and now houses the Sports Legends Museum. George Herman Ruth was born around the corner in a rowhouse at 216 Emory Street.

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Written by monumentcity

February 20th, 2009 at 9:40 am