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Archive for the ‘Star-Spangled Banner’ Category

Francis Scott Key Death Marker in Mount Vernon

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On the front of the United Methodist Church in Mount Vernon Place is a tablet to Francis Scott Key. The plaque was created in 1912 by Hans Schuler and marks the location of the lawyer’s death. Key died of pleurisy in his daughter’s home, formerly located on this site, at the age of 64. The historic Asbury House, designed by J. Rudolph Niernsee and James Crawford Neilson, is next door.

Written by monumentcity

April 29th, 2009 at 7:29 am

Star-Spangled Banner Centennial Monument

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E Pratt Street & S Patterson Park Avenue, next to the Pagoda

GPS: 39° 17′ 23.74″ N 76° 35′ 0.99″ W

History

The Centennial Celebration of the Star-Spangled Banner was a week long event held in Baltimore in 1914. The festivities marked the city’s successful defense of it’s borders during the War of 1812. The ceremonies included parades, balls, parties, performances and numerous monument dedications. J. Maxwell Miller, a close friend and colleague of artists Edward Berge and Hans Schuler, produced the Star-Spangled Banner Memorial for the occasion. The sculpture depicts two school children holding a scroll that reads: “To commemorate the centennial of the writing of the Star-Spangled Banner, the pupils of the public schools of Baltimore have erected this memorial upon Hampstead Hill where in September, 1814, the citizen soldiers of Maryland stood ready to sacrifice their lives in defense of their homes and their country.”

Notes

Situated in the vicinity of Commodore John Rodgers’ headquarters during the Battle of Baltimore, the monument stands next to the Pagoda on historic Hampstead Hill.

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Written by monumentcity

April 9th, 2009 at 3:58 pm

Rodgers’ Bastion Memorial Cannon in Patterson Park

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E Pratt Street & S Patterson Park Avenue, next to the Pagoda

GPS: 39° 17′ 23.45″ N 76° 35′ 1.62″ W

History

In 1814, after the sacking of Washington, British troops marched on Baltimore, attacking by sea and by land. Britain wished to put an end to American privateering, and considered Baltimore’s port to be a haven for pirates. They attempted to sail past Fort McHenry while sending ground troops through what was then known as North Point. The two-pronged attack was doomed to fail. Commodore John Rodgers, a famous Navy General, was in command of ground troops stationed on Hampstead Hill in Patterson Park. He had over 12,000 volunteers and 100 cannons, strategically placed, ready to defend Charm City. On the way into Baltimore, British General Robert Ross, who helped defeat Napoleon, was shot and killed. The loss of field leadership coupled with bad weather and little support from their flotilla forced the British into an early retreat. The flag still hung at Fort McHenry the next day, and the Star-Spangled Banner was written. America was safe, and the defense of Baltimore had been successful. The cannon monument was dedicated in 1914 during the centennial celebration of the War of 1812 and the Battle of Baltimore.

Notes

Just off the northwest entrance to Patterson Park, the monument stands below the pagoda. The Star-Spangled Banner Centennial Memorial rests a few paces northeast and several more cannons flank the area. The location provides an impressive view of the park and city beyond.

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Written by monumentcity

April 8th, 2009 at 4:05 pm

Francis Scott Key Monument in Bolton Hill

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Eutaw Place & W Lanvale Street (Street View)

GPS: 39° 18′ 14.24″ N 76° 37′ 34.15″ W

History

This multifaceted sculpture is one of two major memorials dedicated to Francis Scott Key, the author of the Star-Spangled Banner, which only became America’s National Anthem officially in 1931. The other is located in Fort McHenry, though there are several markers and smaller memorials dedicated all around Baltimore to the actual song itself. The Bolton Hill piece was commissioned in 1907 by Charles and Theodore Marburg, part of a prominent mercantile family at the time and executed by French sculptor Marius Jean Antonin Mercie.

Dedicated on May 15, 1911. In 1996, residents from the local neighborhood raised money to restore this monument, receiving significant financial boosts in 1997 from the Maryland Military Monuments Commission, and in 1998 from the Save Outdoor Sculpture initiative (funded in large part by Target stores), along with grants from the City of Baltimore. At this location, First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton delivered a speech on the importance of preserving historical markers in 1998. Restoration was completed by the summer of 1999.

Notes

Standing amidst a broad park which runs north and south along Eutaw Place, the monument heroically depicts Key as poet in a row boat with another sailor humbly manning the oars. Key is standing, holding a manuscript of his poem up as an offering to the allegorical figure of Columbia. The figure of Columbia is gilded, and stands atop four pillars waving a flag. The Eutaw Place Temple stands across the street from the fountain.

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Written by monumentcity

March 31st, 2009 at 3:18 pm

Francis Scott Key Monument at Fort McHenry

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Within Fort McHenry’s Constellation Plaza (Street View)

GPS: 39° 15′ 50.91″ N 76° 34′ 54.75″ W

History

This larger-than-life monument depicts the Greek mythological hero of music and poetry, Orpheus with his lyre. Around the base are depictions of Francis Scott Key and the muses celebrating the victory of the American defenders of Fort McHenry against the British in the War of 1812. Key (1779-1843) penned the words to the Star-Spangled Banner (which were subsequently put to a British drinking song) after having watched the bombardment of Fort McHenry from a British vessel, where he was negotiating the release of Dr. William Beanes, a resident of Upper Marlboro, Maryland. This magnificent piece by sculptor Charles Henry Niehaus was dedicated on June 14, 1922 and was originally situated in the middle of the entrance road to the fort, being moved to its current location in 1962. This monument is one of many in Baltimore commemorating Francis Scott Key. Two others are located in Bolton Hill and Mount Vernon Place, respectively.

Notes

In person, this monument is immense and sits quite imposingly against the open landscape on the south edge of Fort McHenry. In the distance to the south lies the windswept water. Small trees have been planted in the vicinity in honor of George Washington and other heroes. Interestingly, though Key wrote the words to the song in 1814, it was only in 1931 that a law was finally passed making the Star-Spangled Banner the National Anthem of the United States of America. At the dedication of this monument in 1922, President Harding became the first American president to be broadcast on coast-to-coast radio. The pedestal contains a time capsule that holds historic documents.

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Written by monumentcity

March 3rd, 2009 at 10:38 am

George Armistead Monument at Fort McHenry

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Next to Visitors Center of Ft. McHenry (Street View)

GPS: 39° 15′ 52.55″ N 76° 34′ 47.34″ W

History

Col. George Armistead (1780-1818) was a Virginia-born artillery officer who served as commander of Fort McHenry during the War of 1812’s Battle of Baltimore. Armistead is most well-known for ordering a massive American flag to be installed at the fortress, measuring forty-two feet by thirty feet, “a flag so large that the British would have no difficulty in seeing it from a distance.” The flag contained fifteen stars and fifteen stripes, was crafted by Mary Pickersgill and later became the inspiration for Francis Scott Key’s Star Spangled Banner, the National Anthem of the United States of America. Armistead is buried in Old St. Paul’s Cemetery, alongside his nephew Confederate General Lewis Addison Armistead. This monument was dedicated on the twelfth of September in 1914, one hundred years after the Battle of Baltimore. Artist: Edward Berge.

Notes

This monument stands outside the entrance to the visitor’s center at Fort McHenry, which itself is considered a National Monument and Historic Shrine. It is one of two monuments to this military hero in the city, the other located on the crest of Federal Hill, overlooking the Inner Harbor. During WWII, Fort McHenry served as a Coast Guard base.

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Written by monumentcity

March 2nd, 2009 at 10:22 am

George Armistead Monument on Federal Hill

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Federal Hill, Key Highway and Covington Street (Street View)

GPS: 39° 16′ 49.06″ N 76° 36′ 29.23″ W

History

George Armistead was commander of Fort McHenry during the Battle of Baltimore. One of five brothers to serve in the War of 1812, he rapidly distinguished himself as a courageous soldier. After the Americans took Fort George from the British in 1813, Armistead delivered the captured British flags to President James Madison, prompting his appointment as commander of Fort McHenry. He is most famous for ordering the creation of the Star-Spangled Banner, the muse of our national anthem. Goerge Armistead died in 1818, at 38 years of age and is buried at Old Saint Paul’s Cemetery. This marble monument was dedicated in 1882 with G. Metzger serving as architect.

Notes

One of two memorials to Armistead, the other being at Fort McHenry, this monument sits atop Federal Hill overlooking the Inner Harbor. The Samuel Smith monument and a large American flag stand nearby, along with a nice park and playground. This is the site of much activity during the warmer months and offers an excellent vantage point of the city.

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Written by monumentcity

March 2nd, 2009 at 10:19 am

Baltimore’s Battle Monument

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Calvert Street, between Fayette & Lexington Streets (Street View)

GPS: 39° 17′ 26.29″ N 76° 36′ 44.59″ W

History

Commemorates the Battle of North Point, a turning point in the War of 1812, and those who died during the month of September 1814. The monument is the first built in America specifically for the common soldier. Placed on the site of Baltimore’s original courthouse, the location was chosen to preserve the land from further urban development. On the base of the structure is two relief sculptures that depict the bombardment of Fort McHenry and the Battle of North Point. The names of the soldiers that died in the historic conflict are spelled out on bands that wrap the towering column. Lady Baltimore holds a victory wreath at the apex of the fifty-two foot memorial. Designed by architect Maximilian Godefroy and built from 1815-1825. Sculpture by Antonio Capellano.

Notes

Situated in an old and high-energy location downtown, the Battle Monument is famously depicted on the flag and seal of Baltimore City. The area has a great deal of foot traffic, with people pausing to sit, look and eat lunch in the pleasant median splitting motor traffic. The United States Court House and Post Office building stand on the east side of the monument, the Post Office serving as the second courthouse today. Many interesting historical plaques adorn the grounds of the monument, including one of the city’s Heritage Walk markers. The female figure atop the pedestal is Lady Baltimore, an embodiment of the spirit of the city.

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Written by monumentcity

February 20th, 2009 at 8:45 am